from the firewall back… heater, controls, wiring, seats, carpets, and more….

My system of keeping the pieces together has worked pretty well. Here were all the parts necessary, all the hardware, for the job… and you’ll see below, only had a couple of pieces left over πŸ™‚

All the nuts, washers, screws and grommets needed for the job....

Not everything is as clear, of course; but, the main pieces that must go back on. Not tagged well enough at times with 50 or 60 such little containers; but, usually enough to know what the job was based on the condition of the contents (i.e., greasy studs, probably engine, sheet metal screws, probably interior, etc.).

This is just about as close as I ever want to get to this side of the firewall again. The dash is removed and the metal support that holds the steering column up had to come out to access things. It needed painting anyway; although, with any luck, it will NEVER been seen again. That’s just how I do things.

iHeater core in its suitcase on floormg_6230

In 2013, I posted about a replacement heater core purchased from AutoZone here. I won’t go into those details again; but, notice, this is the original, 28+ year old heater core. It was serviced by Ronnie’s Radiator in Escondido and fitted with new rubber o-rings… as good as new.

Heater Core from the top

Heater core in its suitcase on floor. It has to connect with rubber seals to the other half of the suitcase still attached to the firewall. That’s the AC side, while the heater side is still on the floor. The ECU goes back up under there somewhere…

Another shot of the heater core, and other half of the "suitcase" still under dash with a good view of the wiring harness and connectors

Another shot of the heater core, and other half of the “suitcase” still under dash with a good view of the wiring harness and connectors

One more view from the passenger side

One more view from the passenger side

Shot of the tunnel, shift lever cutout and handbrake control...

Shot of the tunnel, shift lever cutout and handbrake control…

Bunches of wiring pictures...

Bunches of wiring pictures…

Both halves of the suitcase… installed. Lots of pictures here on wiring… remember, all these connectors have to re-connect behind the dash… later πŸ™‚

Bunches of wiring pictures...

Bunches of wiring pictures…

Bunches of wiring pictures...

Bunches of wiring pictures…

Steering column brace on passenger side...

Steering column brace on passenger side…

Steering column brace, center shot with bracket for console attached

Steering column brace, center shot with bracket for console attached

Steering column brace, driver's side view...

Steering column brace, driver’s side view…

The turn signal switch (not pictured here) has been waiting to go back together for years… I believe there’s another post on it… if not, there sure should be. It was a job one of my sons, Ken, and I started around 2011… It’s been worked on a few times, and a used one was purchased as a model… The original will go back on… and all the plastic covers and sleeves are in one box… so eventually, all of this will be hidden again.

First time the steering wheel has been supported in years :)

First time the steering wheel has been supported in years πŸ™‚

Notice the speedo cable, green sleeve with white cover… the routing of this will become very important very soon.

Dozens of connectors... like these...

Dozens of connectors… like these…

Can't begin to tell you why I shot this picture... and it's not very good... but, alas, probably took it for a reason, so here it is folks.

Can’t begin to tell you why I shot this picture… and it’s not very good… but, alas, probably took it for a reason, so here it is folks.

Closeup of the adjustable steering column mechanism

Closeup of the adjustable steering column mechanism

The exact routing of this cable will become important on re-assembly. For now, just remember that there’s only one correct route between the firewall and the speedo head.

Speedometer Cable through Firewall on Driver's Side

Speedometer Cable through Firewall on Driver’s Side

It is a little hard to know why some pictures were taken when they were, and when I can’t find what I’m looking for, to understand why I didn’t take other shots. This picture was intended to show the wiring, and well as the connection between the two segments of the housing… the fitment of the weatherstripping between, and the missing nut was because it was a trial fit….

Wiring harness behind dash, over heater core unit

Wiring harness behind dash, over heater core unit

Love my chassis number: 99003… sounds lucky to me πŸ™‚

Heater Core Tubes through the Firewall

Heater Core Tubes through the Firewall

Heater Core Tubes through the Firewall

Heater Core Tubes through the Firewall

Glad I took this shot… there’s rust in this picture… must be fixed. I know of NO OTHER rust on the car… surely there must be; but, working very hard to correct any I find. This car has been rained on ONCE in the past 12 years. That was while at the body shop, with the windshield out… and it ruining the original dash.

BTW, when I replaced the dash, I also switched the dash wiring harness so it would continue to match the rest of the harness still in the car.

Heater Core Tubes through the Firewall

Heater Core Tubes through the Firewall

My system isn’t flawless. After three years, here’s what I missed putting back in… The clip and the bracket, I understand. The two nylon pieces have me worried. I would hate to take the heater core back out again. Time will tell.

Four parts that I did not use...

Four parts that I did not use…

The 28 year old gasket around these currently exposed ducts will be replaced with more of the rubber material as used between the cases.

As the plastic housing goes back on...

As the plastic housing goes back on…

Here is one picture of the steering wheel bracket going back in the car. I know I took four pictures as the unit goes in from the passenger’s side. It’s a little tricky as it slides into place… hopefully, I will find the other pictures to explain.

Steering wheel bracket reinstalled

Steering wheel bracket reinstalled

It has been a long time since removing the dash and console, so I forgot these ducts until trying to smoothly install the new carpet. There was something needed under the carpet to fill those pre-formed bulges. Ah, yes, the ducts. The passenger side went on with no problem; but, the driver’s side required the newly installed hush-mat to be removed in spots.

Plastic heater ducts under the carpet...

Plastic heater ducts under the carpet…

Not too much hush-mat had to come off… and I got rather good at working with it.

Hush-mat on the floor...

Photo out of sequence; but, better shot of hush mat going down.

Hush mat installation progressing

Hush mat installation progressing

Ah, yes! The steering wheel... back again!

Ah, yes! The steering wheel… back again!

Test fit of Recaro seat brackets and slides

Test fit of Recaro seat brackets and slides

Slides and brackets

Slides and brackets

Another angle

Another angle

img_6269

Where’s the instruction sheet?

I knew where these went... once.

I knew where these went… once.

Seats mounted and sliding

Seats mounted and sliding

From the rear... looking good; but, ...

From the rear… looking good; but, …

Must measure for anti-submarine belt brackets

Must measure for anti-submarine belt brackets

Looking over steering wheel at driver's bucket seat

Looking over steering wheel at driver’s bucket seat

Same angle... better view....

Same angle… better view….

Steering wheel and seats installed

Steering wheel and seats installed

View from the driver's seat

View from the driver’s seat

6-point harness, through seat, in car, not attached.

6-point harness, through seat, in car, not attached.

Anti-submarine belts with fit through that slit in seat and mount to brackets which must be welded to the floor.

Anti-submarine belts with fit through that slit in seat and mount to brackets which must be welded to the floor.

Notice that left driver and right passenger belts do not line up with the attachment brace... yet.

Notice that left driver and right passenger belts do not line up with the attachment brace… yet.

closer look at one...

closer look at one…

then the other...

then the other…

Here the anti-submarine belts are routed through the seat

Here the anti-submarine belts are routed through the seat

View with the seat cushion (bottom) removed

View with the seat cushion (bottom) removed

Little closer to attaching shoulder belts to bracket

Little closer to attaching shoulder belts to bracket

Another shot...

Another shot…

Closer; but, not right yet...

Closer; but, not right yet…

Look again...

Look again…

and again...

and again…

As it was left last time....

As it was left last time….

The seats have been test fitted three times now. The slide isn’t as smooth as I’d like, particularly since there is no place to really, safely, pull on. Not the steering wheel, and minimize hands on the paint… please.

More grease did not make them work easier; but, convinced me that they are working right. I am 5’9″ with a 29″ inseam. My son is 6’2″ with a 33/34 inseam. When the driver’s seat is pushed back, I sit with my legs extended horizontally and my feet are two inches off the pedal. All the way forward and I could drive; but, would not.

The anti-submarine belt has to fit from the crotch straight down (90 degrees) or with up to a 20 degree angle/slant toward the rear. In order for both drivers, 29″ and 33/34″ inseam to drive, the bracket must be welding so when I drive it is at the 20 degree angle, and when my son drives, the belt is straight down (i.e., at 90 degrees).

It’s either that, or welding in multiple brackets and requiring the change to be made between drivers. This should become a point if the car is ever sold… It’s dangerous enough, don’t sue me if I’m wrong.

At the moment, you can see that the shoulder belts do not line up with where they are supposed to route through the bracket behind the seat. This means at least one more test fit before the final fit over carpet. There is a small amount of space between the brackets and the slides to move them inwards, toward the tunnel. As it is today, the doors can only be shut with the seats in the back position, or with the windows slightly rolled down. No battery power yet, so don’t shut the doors. The brackets and slides were a custom fit for the Supra, so I know they will work. We’re talking a quarter of an inch to a half, at most.

There are still three welding jobs, and my new neighbor at the garage is teaching me to use my welder. soon, hopefully, more progress on my baby Supra.

The heart and two coins were found in the rubble: dated 1987 and 1988, and probably hidden since new. Dana (Dayna) was our choice for a girls name; but, we had two boys. Now, my car is named Dana πŸ™‚

More to come. Thank you for your interest. Hope all the pictures help someone some day. David

30 year career in data, analysis, architecture, transformations, migrations, replication, using Oracle, Sybase, SQL Server, DB/2, XDB, Informix, Ingres, Seed, SQL DB/4381, and others. Nobody buys a database. People buy solutions. AWS is my network.

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